Last edited by Dasar
Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of Stephanie Kwolek found in the catalog.

Stephanie Kwolek

Gail B. Stewart

Stephanie Kwolek

inventor of Kevlar

by Gail B. Stewart

  • 373 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by KidHaven Press in Detroit .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Kwolek, Stephanie, -- 1923- -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Industrial chemists -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Inventors -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Ballistic fabrics -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Polyphenyleneterephthalamide -- Juvenile literature.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementby Gail B. Stewart.
    GenreJuvenile literature., Biography
    SeriesInventors
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTS1440.K96 S74 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19141838M
    ISBN 109780737740400
    LC Control Number2008009190
    OCLC/WorldCa212432561

    WHEN STEPHANIE LOUISE KWOLEK RECEIVE D HER B.S., WITH a major in chemistry, from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) in , she didn’t have enough money to pursue her dream of going on to medical school. So she accepted a research job with DuPont, hoping to eventually get a medical degree. But she discovered that she liked the work so much, with .   — Stephanie Kwolek From transcript for video interview (, published Aug ), 'Stephanie Kwolek: Curiosity and the Discovery of Kevlar', in the series Women in Chemistry, on Chemical Heritage Foundation website.

    As a young girl, Stephanie Kwolek spent time exploring the woods with her father, John, a naturalist. She was great around animals and knew how to study them on quiet feet. Her father instructed her in noiseless observation. He taught her to examine details, remember to focus and take in everything that happened around her.   The book, by Edwin Brit Wyckoff, is titled “The Woman Who Invented the Thread That Stops the Bullets: The Genius of Stephanie Kwolek.” Advertisement Continue reading the main story.

      A chemist testing new synthetic polymers at DuPont in the s, Stephanie Kwolek discovered a substance that weighs very little but is strong and stiff beyond anyone's imagination. A few years later, her invention—Kevlar®—is used to make bullet-resistant vests and helmets, saving thousands of lives. A chemist testing new synthetic polymers at DuPont in the s, Stephanie Kwolek discovered a substance that weighs very little but is strong and stiff beyond anyone's imagination. A few years later, her invention—Kevlar®—is used to make bullet-resistant vests and helmets, saving thousands of lives.


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Stephanie Kwolek by Gail B. Stewart Download PDF EPUB FB2

Stephanie Louise Kwolek should be on TIME Magazine, the most intelligent woman in the world. Bullet proof safety blankets should be in every school, this is something every child - adult should have -it would spare PTSD somewhat -all children and adults would throw a bullet proof blanket over their head and feel better -its a natural/5(3).

Stephanie Louise Kwolek is an American chemist who invented poly-paraphenylene terephtalamide—better known as Kevlar. She was born in the Pittsburgh suburb of New Kensington, Pennsylvania. Inin anticipation of a gasoline shortage, her group began searching for a lightweight yet strong fiber to be used in tires.5/5(2).

Stephanie Kwolek was born on Jin New Kensington, Pennsylvania. Her father worked in the Pittsburgh steel industry but was a naturalist at heart, while her mother was at first a homemaker, and then a career woman by necessity.

From her father, Kwolek learned a great deal about nature. Her mother gave her a love of sewing and fabrics. Little is it mentioned that for poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide, better known as Kevlar or bullet-stopping fibre, we have Stephanie Louise Kwolek to thank.

She was an American chemist, whose career at the DuPont company spanned over forty years. Originally looking for a lightweight material to be used in tires due to an impending gas shortage, her team created a life-saving materials instead. Stephanie Kwolek: | | | |Stephanie Kwolek| | | | | || World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most.

Rachel Swaby, the author of the bestselling science book for teen and adult readers, Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science – And The World, profiles 33 women in this book, including groundbreaking figures like Virginia Apgar, Stephanie Kwolek, Sally Ride, and Rachel Carson.

Best of all, Swaby emphasizes that it takes work, practice, and. Stephanie Kwolek, American chemist, a pioneer in polymer research whose work yielded Kevlar, an ultrastrong and ultrathick material best known for its use in bulletproof vests. Kwolek’s father, a foundry worker, died when she was 10 years old, and her mother raised her and a brother alone.

In   Stephanie Kwolek later in life. Chemical Heritage Foundation via Wikimedia Commons. Kwolek was honored with an Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Medal of Honor, along with induction into the National Plastics Hall of Fame and the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

She lived in Wilmington, Delaware until she passed away in An American chemist, a pioneer in polymer research whose work yielded Kevlar, an ultrastrong and ultrathick material best known for its use in bulletproof vests, Stephanie Kwolek was born to Polish immigrant parents in the Pittsburgh suburb of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, the U.S.

on 31st July She was an organic chemist, best known for inventing [ ]. Stephanie Kwolek begins the interview with a discussion of her early career at DuPont. She joined DuPont inthe same year she earned her B.S.

in chemistry at Carnegie-Mellon University. Kwolek spent much of her time working on polymers, including aliphatic and aromatic Size: 75KB. In the chemical company DuPont was looking for its next big innovations, the kind of products that would change people's lives.

It assigned a research chemist named Stephanie Kwolek to. The inventor of Kevlar. In DuPont began searching for a next-generation, high-performance, light-weight fibre which could replace the steel wire in vehicle tires and ensure better fuel economy.

Stephanie was tasked with synthesising long-chain aromatic polyamides, dissolving them in solvents and then spinning the resultant solutions into. Stephanie Louise Kwolek (J – J ) was an American invented poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide—better known as Kevlar.

She was born in the Pittsburgh suburb of New Kensington, won many awards for her work in polymer chemistry. Kwolek died in Wilmington, Delaware from a short-illness, at the age 90 on J Born: Stephanie Louise Kwolek, JNew.

Stephanie Louise Kwolek (n iulie – d. 18 iunie ) a fost o chimistă americană, a cărui carieră la compania DuPont a durat peste patruzeci de ani. Ea este cel mai bine cunoscută pentru inventarea unei clase de fibre sintetice, de o rezistență și rigiditate excepțională: poliparafenilentereftalamida, mai bine cunoscută sub denumirea comercială de ățenie: SUA, Polonia.

“To invent, I draw upon my knowledge, intuition, creativity, experience, common sense, perseverance, flexibility, and hard work.” Stephanie Kwolek is the chemist who invented Kevlar in She started working as a chemist in just to earn enough money to go to medical school, to fulfill her childhood dream of becoming a doctor.

She [ ]. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Stephanie Kwolek graduated college in with a degree in chemistry and dreams of becoming a doctor. Unable to afford medical school at the time, Kwolek went to.

This story originally appeared on Massive Science, an editorial partner site that publishes science stories by scientists.

There’s a pile of fibers that Stephanie Kwolek helped invent. She laid the. In her story became one in a series of children's books about inventors and innovative ideas. The book, written by Edwin Brit Wyckoff, is titled "The Woman Who Invented the Thread That Stops the Bullets: The Genius of Stephanie Kwolek Burial: Saint Mary's Cemetery, Lower Burrell.

Stephanie Louise Kwolek was born on Jin New Kensington, Pennsylvania. Her father, a foundry worker, died when she was 10 years old, and her mother raised her and a brother alone.

In Kwolek received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), in Pittsburgh. Pioneering chemist Stephanie Kwolek -- whose invention of Kevlar has saved countless lives -- was born on this day in Kevlar is a fiber five times stronger than steel that is now used in numerous products ranging from boots for firefighters to spacecraft -- and most famously, in bulletproof vests.Get this from a library!

Stephanie Kwolek: creator of Kevlar. [Gail B Stewart] -- Presents a short biography of the life and accomplishments of Stephanie Kwolek.The papers of Stephanie L. Kwolek chronicle her work over a forty year span at DuPont.

The collection includes patents, journal articles, awards, subject files, and speeches that were either produced by or aided Kwolek in her work.